"De Colores" (literally, Of Colors) is a traditional folk-song that is well known throughout the Spanish-speaking world.  The song was brought to the Americas from Spain in the 16th century.

  In modern times, the song frequently appears in collections of children's songs.   It is widely used in the Cursillo movement and related communities such as the Great Banquet, Chrysalis Flight,  Walk to Emmaus and, of course, Via de Cristo.   It is also an unofficial anthem for the United Farm Workers union.

  De Colores means "of colors" in Spanish and is meant to reflect the many colors of Christ.  The words of the song are an expression of joy and a celebration of all creation with its many bright colors.  The brightly colored rooster is a symbol of De Colores.

(pronounced day cuh-lor'-ess) is a greeting.
It comes from the Spanish song below!
Verse 1:

Of colors, colors
the fields in the spring get dressed.
Of colors, colors
they are the little birds that come from outside.
Of colors, colors
it is the rainbow that we see shine.
And for that reason the great loves
of many colors, they (the colors) please me.
And for that reason the great loves
of many colors, they (the colors) please me.

Verse 2:

The rooster sings, sings the rooster
with kiri, kiri, kiri, kiri, kiri.
The hen, the hen
with kara, kara, kara, kara, kara.
The chicks, the chicks
with pio, pio, pio, pio, pi.
And for that reason the great loves
of many colors, they (the colors) please me.
And for that reason the great loves
of many colors, they (the colors) please me.